How to Pitch an Angel Investor

13.11.2018   |  Startup

Every month, I receive dozens of financing questions or requests that are more or less detailed. Almost all have something interesting in them. However, as my time and financial resources are limited, the ideas that I plan to use are only a few every year. I am not the only professional investor who has in mind a set of criteria according to which we validate an idea. Following is a list proposed by me. When making it, I have tried to be as objective as possible.

What?

  • Start off with the essence, define the idea in a sentence. Do you know what USP or Unique Selling Proposition is? It is a concept from advertising and refers to the sole benefit proposed by your product. Maybe, you know that I have invested in Vector Watch and together with the other investors I have enjoyed its success, when it was sold to the famous Fitbit. From the very beginning, Vector Watch is a smartwatch different from the rest, whose battery lasts for one month. This is the starting idea and it is clear, even though there are several other aspects to add afterwards.
  • What is your business plan? How do you monetize? This article does not aim at giving you tips on how to make a business plan. What you should note, however, is that an excellent idea, without the steps leading to it putting into practice is as good as null. Gutenberg invented the printing press by putting together already existing innovations. The printing press was taken over from the vineyard people, whereas the print with block molds had already existed in China for over 1000 years. And still, he revolutionized the world as he was intelligent enough to put all these together and turn them into a functional technology.
  • What is your market? Good start-ups mean creative, or even disruptive ideas, but they do not work by themselves. Vector Watch was an innovation on the smartwatch market and Gutenberg’s printing press replaced the medieval manuscripts, so they turned up in an existing background. Show your financer in what area of products or services you fit. They will all the more appreciate your innovation.
  • Growth opportunities/strategies/exit. If you don’t know yet that angel investors provide financing in order to get benefits at a later date, you should read business literature seriously. Your business may turn, logically, into a listed company and it may skyrocket by the subsequent contribution of an investment fund or it may be sold to a market giant. This evolution is also dictated by its nature and also by your personal preferences. Where do you see yourself in 10-year time? As CEO and minority shareholder of the company created by you, as Steve Jobs? Or maybe developing a quite different business? Relying on your exit money to invest in other people’s businesses, therefore acting as an angel yourself? You should answer all these questions and then send your answers also to possible investors.

How?

  • Clearly state to your investor what/how much you. Of course, the answer to the question “How much?” is the most important. Shyness has no place here, the well-grounded figures are strictly necessary, even if you won’t start with them, but with the idea. However, the financing pace/calendar is also important: if need be, a professional investor may rely not only on their money, but they will also know how to attract other resources.
  • Do your homework. It’s not necessary to suffocate with data the potential financers from the very beginning. However, if you have manage to arise interest by the initial presentation, you must be ready to answer any question. If you don’t have the answer in your mind, you can resort to notes, telephone, laptop. If you nevertheless happen to not know the answer, don’t try to mislead your interlocutor with phrases such as “We’ll see”. Not knowing a minor aspect is pardonable, but superficiality isn’t.
  • You will always need an attractive Powerpoint presentation, even if it is an informal pitch meant to arise interest. Assuming that you have managed to arise interest from the very beginning, the presentation is the second stage. However, be careful, as there are two types of presentations: those meant to be designed, which come as a completion of speech discourse and the self-standing ones, which are meant to be sent by e-mail. Ideally, you should prepare both versions.

Where?

  • Personal recommendations. These are certainly the most effective, although in Romania we tend to pay too much heed to them. Two things are worth mentioning here. Firstly, it is most serious if you disappoint the author of the recommendations. If you do that, no one will take it out on you directly, but your failure risks to be mentioned in the private talks between people who matter. If, on the other hand, you manage to make your potential partner enthusiastic about your project, it is a success: your personal recommendations might turn into endorsement. If you can turn a financer or a famous partner into an endorser, that is quite an achievement for you.
  • Industry events. The same as, in our country, personal recommendations are overrated, events are underrated. You have often heard that, at specialized conferences, it is the networking that matters, not the presentations. If you invest a few thousand euros in the participation in an event of the Mobile World Congress class, you will head home with a few dozen of business cards. If you manage these contacts well, some of them might become your business partners or financers. The thing is that events are very useful for a first contact, which you then need to cultivate by other means.
  • Online, in 1:1 conversations. By “1:1 conversations” I mean whatever can be conveyed via social networks or e-mail. LinkedIn is very appropriate for this purpose, as long as you know whom you are addressing and what you are asking. Don’t be shy, but avoid suffocating your potential partners with generalities, standard messages, so called spam. Of course, those who make their e-mail addresses public do that because they are open to proposals. If the e-mail is written well, it will receive an answer, especially from the potential foreign partners – even if it is a negative one.
  • Online, by public financing requests, such as Kickstarter or Patreon. It may seem that the crowdfunding platforms are meant for charity or cultural projects, financed with little by many, but this is not exactly so. A successful campaign on a platform of this kind is a good argument for a more significant investor. Even more, even as part of these campaigns, sometimes there is significant financing from individual investors, besides the “little” financing from “many”.

When?

The question does not refer to the time of day or the year when you make the proposal, but to the degree of maturity of your idea. Writing this article, I have started from the idea that you have incorporated a startup, in other words, you have the capacity of founder and entrepreneur. Well, in order to attract an investment, you must have already proven your reliability to a certain extent. This means a functional business, even if of a small scope and without profit. Professional investors are attracted by more than plans on paper. As long as they will entrust you with their money, they expect guarantees that you will know what to do with it and the safest guarantee is that you have already achieved something with your own forces.

Octavian Pătrașcu  |   13.11.2018   |  Startup
Coronavirus vs. the Financial markets

Coronavirus vs. the Financial markets

31.03.2020   |  Capital Market

After an extraordinary 2019 for the financial markets, many global companies had set unrealistic profit targets, with growth that would be hard to sustain.

Let’s not forget that, for the first time in history, the US technology sector recorded market capitalization that exceeded 1 trillion dollars. In such conditions of exacerbated optimism, it’s only natural to expect to see spectacular falls on the international stock exchanges this year. The bar was raised too high in 2019.

• Dow Jones 30 – a historical maximum of 28,500 points

• S&P 500 to 3200 points

• NASDAQ 100 to 9750 points

These were the optimistic figures when 2019 ended. Everyone, including most financial analysts, was expecting 2020 full of new records.

Only this time, the targets couldn’t be reached – the economy, like history, has a tendency to repeat itself. The longest bull market in history (from 2008 until a few days ago) has been ravaged by the Coronavirus pandemic and, as many can state, popped the business bubble in which we used to live.

THE HISTORY OF GLOBAL CRISIS

The history of global crises is spectacular but also cyclical, as in the most recent past we have the great oil crisis in the 70s, the infamous Black Friday of the 80s, a second oil crisis in the early 90s, the dot-com bubble of the 2000s and, more recently, the financial-real estate crisis from 2008.

We can see that roughly every 10 years, the capital markets go through a reestablishment process, resetting their values – an event which we’re in the middle of right now. 

* Since 1945, American blue-chip companies have experienced at least 25 years at an all-time high, 24 years within 10% of an all-time high,  and only 22 years in a declining market (bear market) *

The first signs of weakness started showing up at the end of 2019 – an important factor is one of the stars of the gig economy, WeWork, which was preparing for its primary listing. 

In less than a month, from an alleged market capitalization of about $ 47 billion, the company dropped to less than $ 10 billion, canceled listing plans, fired much of the workforce, and even removed its CEO from the company’s management, being rescued from bankruptcy only by one of the banking groups in the shareholding board. 

In the case of WeWork, the reason for the fall was the circumspection that investors began to have in the quality and stability of the company. But the WeWork case is not unique.

WHAT'S NEXT?

Phase 1 - FEAR

As in 2008, the capital markets and investors initially reacted emotionally, triggering what is called a sell-off panic. Right now, we have a reaction based on instinct, market expectations being that global stock exchanges will reach a general decrease of up to 20%.

After more than a decade of "pampering", a period when money was extremely cheap, friendly lending and market conditions were all favoring growth, the reality is coming down.

Many businesses will have their skills tested, (just as a heavy sea shapes a sailor’s skills, only a real market, built on healthy fundamentals, will train enduring entrepreneurs).

At the moment, the general feeling is one of uncertainty, nobody knowing what to expect, with postponed investments, and expansion and development plans put back in the drawer - all eyes are focused on the state, central banks, and global vectors.

Phase 2 - THE FUNDAMENTALS

After the first wave of decline, we’ll see the markets adapting to new conditions – this being the turning point that can make the difference in a medium to long timeframe between the economies that are recovering - and will even prosper in the post-Coronavirus era - and those that will slow down the economic recovery.

There are two extremely important evaluations:

  • Operational evaluation - production and sales figures will be put together (phones sold by Apple, electric cars produced by Tesla, etc.) 
  • Financial evaluation - financial reports that measure the returns of market shares, revenues, income, profits

I am afraid that once all the above figures reach the market, a second wave of the crisis will start, the one in which the global stock market decreases will rise by another 25-30%.

Overall, on the 2 stages described above, the world expects impairments of up to 50% (eg. DJIA going below 12,000 points).

Businesses are people-based, and when those people lose their jobs, we will start seeing the real dimensions of the crisis. That's why I always pay attention to the labor market figures (the famous US Jobless Claims report hit a record high last week, with about 3.3 million people going into unemployment in just one week).

Phase 3 - THE RECOVERY

The key movement is for central banks and national authorities to take monetary & fiscal measures, and also strengthen the labor market. Economies that will not adapt their structure to the new global conditions are risking a lot, as the rational sell-off, the one based on structural economic decisions and profitability calculations, has a longer life cycle and a much stronger influence than the one caused by initial panic.

Monetary/fiscal support packages have already been launched by all major economies (in the US alone, the Federal Bank announced a $ 3.3 trillion program to counteract the crisis effects), but it won’t be enough: businesses need to adapt their methods, plan everything out in advance, and invest more to add value to their work.

The global economy will recover, markets will reach historic highs again, and investors will regain their optimism. But before all this happens, a global sync with the new economic conditions is deeply needed.

MY BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY

There are 3 extremely important factors that have ruled my business philosophy so far:

• Longevity - I have to build something that will last through it’s added value 

• Liquidity - cash flow is essential; I must maintain a balance between savings and investments

• Legacy – ways of building my business to leave something valuable after me

The same 3 factors mentioned above are the ones that will push some companies to new records and others into bankruptcy.

I am deeply convinced that technology giants like Alphabet, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook will recover quickly and hold onto the growing trend because their fundamentals are healthy, they have huge cash reserves and their business plans are built for the long run.

My predictions are that Amazon will be the first company to reach a market capitalization of 2 trillion dollars - the e-Commerce sector is booming right now.

However, others won’t be so lucky. 

I am more optimistic than in 2008 because I appreciate that the common individual’s level of financial education has increased, governments and central banks have much quicker reactions and are prepared to make any effort to minimize the effects of the crisis.

WHAT TO DO?

I want to leave you with a few recommendations on what’s to be done during a bear market:

Don’t panic! - crises aren’t pleasant, but they’re natural and temporary. History tells us that global stock exchanges spend more than two-thirds of the time close to historical highs)

Take care of your portfolio and finances! - we are all interested in discounts. What better time to buy, right? A global crisis is for the stock market what sales are for shops!

Be patient! - rethink your portfolio, lower your expenses, increase your savings and assets and wait for your return

Hunt opportunities! - moments of crisis create huge investment opportunities - be on the lookout and choose the ones that fit your profile

CONCLUSION

Panic is useless; add structure to your thoughts, plan strategically, be aware of the risks and act with caution.

We’re going through a natural phenomenon, don’t lose your cool, make smart investments and you will soon reap the fruits!

You can follow me on Twitter and LinkedIn

Read full article
Octavian Patrascu Alternative Investments

Why Millennials are choosing alternative investment routes

16.12.2019   |  Capital Market  |  Fintech  |  News  |  Tech

It used to be the case that one would have some money, and they would go to an advisor who would then, in turn, research different markets and make a recommendation. That person would charge their client a fee for managing the money and a success fee should the placement of funds generate a profit. While the former would vary from, generally, 0.5% to 2% (with the rule being that you pay less when you place more money), the latter could go to up to 20% of your profits. And while, in the old days, one would pay for the work the advisor does behind the scenes to research and get top-notch information in a market, the alternatives nowadays no longer justify paying such high prices to place one’s money. The advisor is slowly being replaced by a user’s own research, online investment management companies, or even Artificial Intelligence.

The price for investing your money has also gone dramatically down, with the rise of more and more digital companies using advanced software to analyse data and generate attractive portfolios. 

Stock market investments are also an attractive alternative. However, without experience in the field or a fee-hungry advisor, this can prove to be a problematic choice. The issue is two-fold: on the one side, picking the stocks to “bet” on can be extremely difficult, as it takes serious market research to identify the potential long-term champions; and then, of course, there is the approach that some companies might skyrocket when they are launching new products or tapping into a new market. However, this comes with significant risk, as overnight success is rare, and massive failures have been generating headlines since before we can remember.

One could think that actively investing one's own money is a bold move, but the old-fashioned “keep your money in the bank” option is now a money-losing option.

It’s been 12 years since the modern financial sector started to show its weaknesses, and 11 since the sequence of events that started with Lehman Brothers collapsing nearly destroyed the world economy. The new reality is one of lack of trust in the banks from the younger generation, and of negative interest rates. Yes, in many countries it actually costs you money to have banks take your placements. 

As such, it is no wonder that it actually makes sense to find alternative ways to protect and expand one’s wealth. However, there is one significant risk that one should always consider: while not being tied to big institutions such as banks is what has made these alternatives attractive to younger generations in the first place, the downside to that is that, if anything were to happen to them, they will not have an entity behind them to bail them out, which poses an increased risk to customers. As such, research and caution are highly desirable.

Over the last 2-3 years, the shared economy model, championed by the likes of Uber, has been adopted in more and more industries, including the financial one.

More and more platforms are offering the option for people to create portfolios using small amounts of money, relying on the power of the crowd to create strength when put together.

So, here are a few of the options that are out there, and a bit on how they work:

  • FinTech is always an exciting field. Have a look at players such as Robinhood and Sofi.com, which offer lending, mortgages and investment to categories of people who would not always qualify for support from a traditional bank.
  • Peer-to-peer lending (P2P) uses marketplaces or platforms to match borrowers (people) lenders (also people) - see Mintos, Grupeer, Peerberry, Lendermarket. Those interested can “buy” a share of a loan on the platforms.
  • Startups: new and exciting startups are in the news almost daily. Two of the ones that have piqued my interest are forgeglobal.com, seedrs.com. If you have a more serious amount of money to invest, getting “in on the action” at ground level can be incredibly rewarding, both in terms of supporting an entrepreneur who’s just starting out, as well as potentially getting a significant return for your investment. But, as with everything, make sure you do your due diligence and ample research in the space you are about to invest in.
  • If you want to go industry-specific, there are now marketplaces for investments in real estate. Don’t have enough money to buy and flip a piece of real estate? That’s okay. You can pair up with other investors, crowdfund and get involved that way. Crowd Estate, for example, promises 17% annual returns. 

Please note that I am an investor in some of the companies I have mentioned in this article. This article is not meant to provide investment advice, it is merely an investor’s perspective on alternative investments available. Capital at risk.

Read full article

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In Tech

Octavian Patrascu Alternative Investments
16.12.2019   |   Tech

Why Millennials are choosing alternative investment routes

It used to be the case that one would have some money, and they would go to an advisor who would then, in turn, research different markets and make a recommendation. That person would charge their client a fee for managing the money and a success fee should the placement of funds generate a profit. While the former would vary from, generally, 0.5% to 2% (with the rule being that you pay less when you place more money), the latter could go to up to 20% of your profits. And while, in the old days, one would pay for the work the advisor does behind the scenes to research and get top-notch information in a market, the alternatives nowadays no longer justify paying such high prices to place one’s money. The advisor is slowly being replaced by a user’s own research, online investment management companies, or even Artificial Intelligence.

The price for investing your money has also gone dramatically down, with the rise of more and more digital companies using advanced software to analyse data and generate attractive portfolios. 

Stock market investments are also an attractive alternative. However, without experience in the field or a fee-hungry advisor, this can prove to be a problematic choice. The issue is two-fold: on the one side, picking the stocks to “bet” on can be extremely difficult, as it takes serious market research to identify the potential long-term champions; and then, of course, there is the approach that some companies might skyrocket when they are launching new products or tapping into a new market. However, this comes with significant risk, as overnight success is rare, and massive failures have been generating headlines since before we can remember.

One could think that actively investing one's own money is a bold move, but the old-fashioned “keep your money in the bank” option is now a money-losing option.

It’s been 12 years since the modern financial sector started to show its weaknesses, and 11 since the sequence of events that started with Lehman Brothers collapsing nearly destroyed the world economy. The new reality is one of lack of trust in the banks from the younger generation, and of negative interest rates. Yes, in many countries it actually costs you money to have banks take your placements. 

As such, it is no wonder that it actually makes sense to find alternative ways to protect and expand one’s wealth. However, there is one significant risk that one should always consider: while not being tied to big institutions such as banks is what has made these alternatives attractive to younger generations in the first place, the downside to that is that, if anything were to happen to them, they will not have an entity behind them to bail them out, which poses an increased risk to customers. As such, research and caution are highly desirable.

Over the last 2-3 years, the shared economy model, championed by the likes of Uber, has been adopted in more and more industries, including the financial one.

More and more platforms are offering the option for people to create portfolios using small amounts of money, relying on the power of the crowd to create strength when put together.

So, here are a few of the options that are out there, and a bit on how they work:

  • FinTech is always an exciting field. Have a look at players such as Robinhood and Sofi.com, which offer lending, mortgages and investment to categories of people who would not always qualify for support from a traditional bank.
  • Peer-to-peer lending (P2P) uses marketplaces or platforms to match borrowers (people) lenders (also people) - see Mintos, Grupeer, Peerberry, Lendermarket. Those interested can “buy” a share of a loan on the platforms.
  • Startups: new and exciting startups are in the news almost daily. Two of the ones that have piqued my interest are forgeglobal.com, seedrs.com. If you have a more serious amount of money to invest, getting “in on the action” at ground level can be incredibly rewarding, both in terms of supporting an entrepreneur who’s just starting out, as well as potentially getting a significant return for your investment. But, as with everything, make sure you do your due diligence and ample research in the space you are about to invest in.
  • If you want to go industry-specific, there are now marketplaces for investments in real estate. Don’t have enough money to buy and flip a piece of real estate? That’s okay. You can pair up with other investors, crowdfund and get involved that way. Crowd Estate, for example, promises 17% annual returns. 

Please note that I am an investor in some of the companies I have mentioned in this article. This article is not meant to provide investment advice, it is merely an investor’s perspective on alternative investments available. Capital at risk.

Read full article
24.11.2018   |   Tech

10 technological trends in 2019

The top 10 technological trends of 2019 include, according to consulting company Gartner, exotic notions, such as “digital germs” or the software programmed by the artificial intelligence. The top also includes relatively better known technologies, such as Blockchain or quantum computing.  (more…)
Read full article

Latest Articles
In Capital Market

Coronavirus vs. the Financial markets
31.03.2020   |   Capital Ma...

Coronavirus vs. the Financial markets

After an extraordinary 2019 for the financial markets, many global companies had set unrealistic profit targets, with growth that would be hard to sustain.

Let’s not forget that, for the first time in history, the US technology sector recorded market capitalization that exceeded 1 trillion dollars. In such conditions of exacerbated optimism, it’s only natural to expect to see spectacular falls on the international stock exchanges this year. The bar was raised too high in 2019.

• Dow Jones 30 – a historical maximum of 28,500 points

• S&P 500 to 3200 points

• NASDAQ 100 to 9750 points

These were the optimistic figures when 2019 ended. Everyone, including most financial analysts, was expecting 2020 full of new records.

Only this time, the targets couldn’t be reached – the economy, like history, has a tendency to repeat itself. The longest bull market in history (from 2008 until a few days ago) has been ravaged by the Coronavirus pandemic and, as many can state, popped the business bubble in which we used to live.

THE HISTORY OF GLOBAL CRISIS

The history of global crises is spectacular but also cyclical, as in the most recent past we have the great oil crisis in the 70s, the infamous Black Friday of the 80s, a second oil crisis in the early 90s, the dot-com bubble of the 2000s and, more recently, the financial-real estate crisis from 2008.

We can see that roughly every 10 years, the capital markets go through a reestablishment process, resetting their values – an event which we’re in the middle of right now. 

* Since 1945, American blue-chip companies have experienced at least 25 years at an all-time high, 24 years within 10% of an all-time high,  and only 22 years in a declining market (bear market) *

The first signs of weakness started showing up at the end of 2019 – an important factor is one of the stars of the gig economy, WeWork, which was preparing for its primary listing. 

In less than a month, from an alleged market capitalization of about $ 47 billion, the company dropped to less than $ 10 billion, canceled listing plans, fired much of the workforce, and even removed its CEO from the company’s management, being rescued from bankruptcy only by one of the banking groups in the shareholding board. 

In the case of WeWork, the reason for the fall was the circumspection that investors began to have in the quality and stability of the company. But the WeWork case is not unique.

WHAT'S NEXT?

Phase 1 - FEAR

As in 2008, the capital markets and investors initially reacted emotionally, triggering what is called a sell-off panic. Right now, we have a reaction based on instinct, market expectations being that global stock exchanges will reach a general decrease of up to 20%.

After more than a decade of "pampering", a period when money was extremely cheap, friendly lending and market conditions were all favoring growth, the reality is coming down.

Many businesses will have their skills tested, (just as a heavy sea shapes a sailor’s skills, only a real market, built on healthy fundamentals, will train enduring entrepreneurs).

At the moment, the general feeling is one of uncertainty, nobody knowing what to expect, with postponed investments, and expansion and development plans put back in the drawer - all eyes are focused on the state, central banks, and global vectors.

Phase 2 - THE FUNDAMENTALS

After the first wave of decline, we’ll see the markets adapting to new conditions – this being the turning point that can make the difference in a medium to long timeframe between the economies that are recovering - and will even prosper in the post-Coronavirus era - and those that will slow down the economic recovery.

There are two extremely important evaluations:

  • Operational evaluation - production and sales figures will be put together (phones sold by Apple, electric cars produced by Tesla, etc.) 
  • Financial evaluation - financial reports that measure the returns of market shares, revenues, income, profits

I am afraid that once all the above figures reach the market, a second wave of the crisis will start, the one in which the global stock market decreases will rise by another 25-30%.

Overall, on the 2 stages described above, the world expects impairments of up to 50% (eg. DJIA going below 12,000 points).

Businesses are people-based, and when those people lose their jobs, we will start seeing the real dimensions of the crisis. That's why I always pay attention to the labor market figures (the famous US Jobless Claims report hit a record high last week, with about 3.3 million people going into unemployment in just one week).

Phase 3 - THE RECOVERY

The key movement is for central banks and national authorities to take monetary & fiscal measures, and also strengthen the labor market. Economies that will not adapt their structure to the new global conditions are risking a lot, as the rational sell-off, the one based on structural economic decisions and profitability calculations, has a longer life cycle and a much stronger influence than the one caused by initial panic.

Monetary/fiscal support packages have already been launched by all major economies (in the US alone, the Federal Bank announced a $ 3.3 trillion program to counteract the crisis effects), but it won’t be enough: businesses need to adapt their methods, plan everything out in advance, and invest more to add value to their work.

The global economy will recover, markets will reach historic highs again, and investors will regain their optimism. But before all this happens, a global sync with the new economic conditions is deeply needed.

MY BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY

There are 3 extremely important factors that have ruled my business philosophy so far:

• Longevity - I have to build something that will last through it’s added value 

• Liquidity - cash flow is essential; I must maintain a balance between savings and investments

• Legacy – ways of building my business to leave something valuable after me

The same 3 factors mentioned above are the ones that will push some companies to new records and others into bankruptcy.

I am deeply convinced that technology giants like Alphabet, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook will recover quickly and hold onto the growing trend because their fundamentals are healthy, they have huge cash reserves and their business plans are built for the long run.

My predictions are that Amazon will be the first company to reach a market capitalization of 2 trillion dollars - the e-Commerce sector is booming right now.

However, others won’t be so lucky. 

I am more optimistic than in 2008 because I appreciate that the common individual’s level of financial education has increased, governments and central banks have much quicker reactions and are prepared to make any effort to minimize the effects of the crisis.

WHAT TO DO?

I want to leave you with a few recommendations on what’s to be done during a bear market:

Don’t panic! - crises aren’t pleasant, but they’re natural and temporary. History tells us that global stock exchanges spend more than two-thirds of the time close to historical highs)

Take care of your portfolio and finances! - we are all interested in discounts. What better time to buy, right? A global crisis is for the stock market what sales are for shops!

Be patient! - rethink your portfolio, lower your expenses, increase your savings and assets and wait for your return

Hunt opportunities! - moments of crisis create huge investment opportunities - be on the lookout and choose the ones that fit your profile

CONCLUSION

Panic is useless; add structure to your thoughts, plan strategically, be aware of the risks and act with caution.

We’re going through a natural phenomenon, don’t lose your cool, make smart investments and you will soon reap the fruits!

You can follow me on Twitter and LinkedIn

Read full article
Octavian Patrascu Alternative Investments
16.12.2019   |   Capital Ma...

Why Millennials are choosing alternative investment routes

It used to be the case that one would have some money, and they would go to an advisor who would then, in turn, research different markets and make a recommendation. That person would charge their client a fee for managing the money and a success fee should the placement of funds generate a profit. While the former would vary from, generally, 0.5% to 2% (with the rule being that you pay less when you place more money), the latter could go to up to 20% of your profits. And while, in the old days, one would pay for the work the advisor does behind the scenes to research and get top-notch information in a market, the alternatives nowadays no longer justify paying such high prices to place one’s money. The advisor is slowly being replaced by a user’s own research, online investment management companies, or even Artificial Intelligence.

The price for investing your money has also gone dramatically down, with the rise of more and more digital companies using advanced software to analyse data and generate attractive portfolios. 

Stock market investments are also an attractive alternative. However, without experience in the field or a fee-hungry advisor, this can prove to be a problematic choice. The issue is two-fold: on the one side, picking the stocks to “bet” on can be extremely difficult, as it takes serious market research to identify the potential long-term champions; and then, of course, there is the approach that some companies might skyrocket when they are launching new products or tapping into a new market. However, this comes with significant risk, as overnight success is rare, and massive failures have been generating headlines since before we can remember.

One could think that actively investing one's own money is a bold move, but the old-fashioned “keep your money in the bank” option is now a money-losing option.

It’s been 12 years since the modern financial sector started to show its weaknesses, and 11 since the sequence of events that started with Lehman Brothers collapsing nearly destroyed the world economy. The new reality is one of lack of trust in the banks from the younger generation, and of negative interest rates. Yes, in many countries it actually costs you money to have banks take your placements. 

As such, it is no wonder that it actually makes sense to find alternative ways to protect and expand one’s wealth. However, there is one significant risk that one should always consider: while not being tied to big institutions such as banks is what has made these alternatives attractive to younger generations in the first place, the downside to that is that, if anything were to happen to them, they will not have an entity behind them to bail them out, which poses an increased risk to customers. As such, research and caution are highly desirable.

Over the last 2-3 years, the shared economy model, championed by the likes of Uber, has been adopted in more and more industries, including the financial one.

More and more platforms are offering the option for people to create portfolios using small amounts of money, relying on the power of the crowd to create strength when put together.

So, here are a few of the options that are out there, and a bit on how they work:

  • FinTech is always an exciting field. Have a look at players such as Robinhood and Sofi.com, which offer lending, mortgages and investment to categories of people who would not always qualify for support from a traditional bank.
  • Peer-to-peer lending (P2P) uses marketplaces or platforms to match borrowers (people) lenders (also people) - see Mintos, Grupeer, Peerberry, Lendermarket. Those interested can “buy” a share of a loan on the platforms.
  • Startups: new and exciting startups are in the news almost daily. Two of the ones that have piqued my interest are forgeglobal.com, seedrs.com. If you have a more serious amount of money to invest, getting “in on the action” at ground level can be incredibly rewarding, both in terms of supporting an entrepreneur who’s just starting out, as well as potentially getting a significant return for your investment. But, as with everything, make sure you do your due diligence and ample research in the space you are about to invest in.
  • If you want to go industry-specific, there are now marketplaces for investments in real estate. Don’t have enough money to buy and flip a piece of real estate? That’s okay. You can pair up with other investors, crowdfund and get involved that way. Crowd Estate, for example, promises 17% annual returns. 

Please note that I am an investor in some of the companies I have mentioned in this article. This article is not meant to provide investment advice, it is merely an investor’s perspective on alternative investments available. Capital at risk.

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